Myron L Meters Thanks The U.S. Dept. of Veteran’s Affairs!

Posted by 3 Jul, 2012

Tweet VA History The United States has the most comprehensive system of assistance for veterans of any nation in the world. This benefits system traces its roots back to 1636, when the Pilgrims of Plymouth Colony were at war with the Pequot Indians. The Pilgrims passed a law which stated that disabled soldiers would be […]

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VA History

The United States has the most comprehensive system of assistance for veterans of any nation in the world. This benefits system traces its roots back to 1636, when the Pilgrims of Plymouth Colony were at war with the Pequot Indians. The Pilgrims passed a law which stated that disabled soldiers would be supported by the colony.

The Continental Congress of 1776 encouraged enlistments during the Revolutionary War by providing pensions for soldiers who were disabled. Direct medical and hospital care given to veterans in the early days of the Republic was provided by the individual States and communities. In 1811, the first domiciliary and medical facility for veterans was authorized by the Federal Government. In the 19th century, the Nation’s veterans assistance program was expanded to include benefits and pensions not only for veterans, but also their widows and dependents.

After the Civil War, many State veterans homes were established. Since domiciliary care was available at all State veterans homes, incidental medical and hospital treatment was provided for all injuries and diseases, whether or not of service origin. Indigent and disabled veterans of the Civil War, Indian Wars, Spanish-American War, and Mexican Border period as well as discharged regular members of the Armed Forces were cared for at these homes.

Congress established a new system of veterans benefits when the United States entered World War I in 1917. Included were programs for disability compensation, insurance for service persons and veterans, and vocational rehabilitation for the disabled. By the 1920s, the various benefits were administered by three different Federal agencies: the Veterans Bureau, the Bureau of Pensions of the Interior Department, and the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers.

The establishment of the Veterans Administration came in 1930 when Congress authorized the President to “consolidate and coordinate Government activities affecting war veterans.” The three component agencies became bureaus within the Veterans Administration. Brigadier General Frank T. Hines, who directed the Veterans Bureau for seven years, was named as the first Administrator of Veterans Affairs, a job he held until 1945.

The VA health care system has grown from 54 hospitals in 1930, to include 152 hospitals; 800 community based outpatient clinics; 126 nursing home care units; and 35 domiciliaries. VA health care facilities provide a broad spectrum of medical, surgical, and rehabilitative care. The responsibilities and benefits programs of the Veterans Administration grew enormously during the following six decades. World War II resulted in not only a vast increase in the veteran population, but also in large number of new benefits enacted by the Congress for veterans of the war. The World War II GI Bill, signed into law on June 22, 1944, is said to have had more impact on the American way of life than any law since the Homestead Act of 1862. Further educational assistance acts were passed for the benefit of veterans of the Korean Conflict, the Vietnam Era, Persian Gulf War, Iraq and Afghanistan wars.

In 1973, the Veterans Administration assumed another major responsibility when the National Cemetery System (except for Arlington National Cemetery) was transferred to the Veterans Administration from the Department of the Army. The Agency was charged with the operation of the National Cemetery System, including the marking of graves of all persons in national and State cemeteries (and the graves of veterans in private cemeteries, upon request) as well and administering the State Cemetery Grants Program. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) was established as a Cabinet-level position on March 15, 1989. President Bush hailed the creation of the new Department saying, “There is only one place for the veterans of America, in the Cabinet Room, at the table with the President of the United States of America.”

In 2009, President Obama appointed Secretary Eric K. Shinseki to lead a massive transformation of the VA into a high-performing 21st century organization that can better serve Veterans. Under the leadership of Secretary Shinseki, the VA has adopted three guiding principles to govern the changes underway, namely being people-centric, results-driven, and forward-looking. These principles are reflected in the 16 major initiatives that serve as a platform from which transformation is being executed.

The 16 major initiatives are:

Eliminating Veteran homelessness

Enabling 21st century benefits delivery and services

Automating GI Bill benefits

Creating Virtual Lifetime Electronic Record

Improving Veterans’ mental health

Building Veterans Relationship Management capability to enable convenient, seamless interactions

Designing a Veteran-centric health care model to help Veterans navigate the health care delivery system and receive coordinated care

Enhancing the Veteran experience and access to health care

Ensuring preparedness to meet emergent national needs

Developing capabilities and enabling systems to drive performance and outcomes.

Establishing strong VA management infrastructure and integrated operating model

Transforming human capital management

Performing research and development to enhance the long-term health and well-being of Veterans

Optimizing the utilization of VA’s Capital portfolio by implementing and executing the Strategic Capital Investment Planning (SCIP) process

Improving the quality of health care while reducing cost

Transforming health care delivery through health informatics

Myron L Meters is proud to do business with the VA.

 

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Categories : MyronLMeters.com Valued Customers

Myron L Company Weftec Video.flv

Posted by 22 Nov, 2011

TweetDan Robinson, Myron L North American Sales Manager, describes the features of the Ultrapen PT-1 and the Ultrameter III 9P. Both of these are available at http://MyronLMeters.com. Please visit us on the web at: http://www.myronlmeters.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Myron-L-Meters/147455608645777 Google +: https://plus.google.com/112342237119950323462 Twitter: http://twitter.com/MyronLMeters Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=98473409&trk=tab_pro YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/myronlmeters News: http://waterindustrynews.com As with all Myron L meters, these […]

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Dan Robinson, Myron L North American Sales Manager, describes the features of the Ultrapen PT-1 and the Ultrameter III 9P.

Both of these are available at http://MyronLMeters.com.

Please visit us on the web at:
http://www.myronlmeters.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Myron-L-Meters/147455608645777

Google +: https://plus.google.com/112342237119950323462
Twitter: http://twitter.com/MyronLMeters

Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=98473409&trk=tab_pro

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/myronlmeters

News: http://waterindustrynews.com

As with all Myron L meters, these are available at http://MyronLMeters.com

Please visit us on the web at:
http://www.myronlmeters.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Myron-L-Meters/147455608645777

Google +: https://plus.google.com/112342237119950323462
Twitter: http://twitter.com/MyronLMeters

Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=98473409&trk=tab_pro

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/myronlmeters

News: http://waterindustrynews.com

Categories : Videos

Easy steps to troubleshoot RO and DI water systems

Posted by 12 Mar, 2011

Tweet   How much downtime can you afford?   If you are managing an inline water filtration system such as a reverse osmosis system (RO) or a Deionized water system (DI), then you probably have instrumentation installed in order to monitor the water quality. You rely on the instruments to give accurate and reliable readings, […]

 

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How much downtime can you afford?

 

If you are managing an inline water filtration system such as a reverse osmosis system (RO) or a Deionized water system (DI), then you probably have instrumentation installed in order to monitor the water quality. You rely on the instruments to give accurate and reliable readings, but what happens when the water quality measurements suddenly change? If, For example, the conductivity or TDS numbers are substantially higher or the resistivity reading drops to a low number over night.

 

There are a few things you can do to validate your filtration system and pinpoint the issue. Some RO and DI water systems have sample valves or ports after each filter, so you can draw a water sample and test it. If your water system is set up this way, lucky you! If not, you should consider installing a sample valve or port after each filter in order to test the water quality and performance of the filters.

 

If your water quality measurements suddenly change, the first thing you can do is use a reliable and accurate handheld instrument to test the water quality and compare the readings to your inline instrumentation. Conductivity or TDS measurements are a good indicator of changes in water quality Resistivity measurements are good for DI water systems. Draw a sample of water from your system as close as possible to the location of your inline sensor or probe. If the measurements from your handheld and your inline monitor match then you can begin to troubleshoot your RO or DI water system. If the readings don’t match, you need to troubleshoot your inline monitor to resolve the issue. Contact the supplier of your inline monitor and explain to them that you have verified the water quality of your system with an independent handheld instrument. From there you can diagnose the problem with the inline monitor.

 

Troubleshoot your RO and DI water filtration systems

 

To pinpoint the problem, test at various points throughout your water system. Take conductivity/TDS measurements and record the readings in a data log to identify trends in your water quality. This can help you to evaluate filter and system performance in the future. If you already have these readings, then troubleshooting should be quick and easy.You may be reading this right now because you need to troubleshoot and are not exactly sure where to begin or you don’t have measurement records. In that case, you’ll need to begin sampling the water to identify the issue with the water quality.

 

If you have previously recorded measurements logged…

 

Sample the water before and after each filter, compare the conductivity/TDS measurements to your previous measurements and see if there is a big difference. If so, you may have identified the problem. Continue to do this until you have checked each filter. Replace the ones that are out of performance specification.

 

If you DO NOT have previous recorded measurements logged…

 

Sample the water before and after each filter. Check with the filter manufacturer about the performance specification for each filter. They should be able to tell you the rejection rate, throughput, etc. From there you can determine if the filter is performing to spec based on the before/after measurements. Once you have identified which filter(s) is out of spec, you can begin replacing or changing them.

 

if you do not have a handheld instrument to validate your RO or DI water system, we recommend the Ultrameter II 6P. If you don’t need to test pH or ORP, then get the Ultrameter II 4P. These meters have been used to validate various water systems worldwide,  and are renowned for their accuracy, reliability, and ease of use.

You can check out the Ultrameter II here and save 10% if you order online: http://www.myronlmeters.com/category-s/55.htm

 

More information available at MyronLMeters.com

 

Tags: MyronLMeters.com, Myron L, Ultrameter, Myron L Ultrameter, reverse osmosis, deionized water, RO, DI, water filtration, filtration sytems, water systems 

Categories : Application Advice, Technical Tips

MyronLMeters.com Announces the Arrival of the Myron L Ultrameter III 9P

Posted by 17 Feb, 2011

MyronLMeters.com today announced the arrival of a new Myron L product, the Myron L Ultrameter III, a reliable, easy-to-use meter that measures 9 parameters – conductivity, resistivity, TDS, alkalinity, hardness, saturation index, ORP/free chlorine, pH and temperature.

Myron L Ultrameter III 9P

MyronLMeters.com today announced the arrival of a new Myron L product, the , Myron L Ultrameter III 9P , a reliable, easy-to-use meter that measures 9 parameters – conductivity, resistivity, TDS, alkalinity, hardness, saturation index, ORP/free chlorine, pH and temperature.

“The Ultrameter III is available right now at MyronLMeters.com,” said James Rutan, president. “We’ve made it easy to order, offer great training videos, technical bulletins, manuals, and a 10% discount…just for ordering online. In addition, all Myron L Meters in stock will ship the next business day. The quality of the Ultrameter III and the company’s great reputation for reliable meters is sure to make this a big hit. Don’t forget – this new Ultrameter has wireless data transfer capability when you buy the bluDock.  Expect about a 10 day lead time for a week or so.”

MyronLMeters.com carries the full line of Ultrameter III accessories, including the Ultrameter III 9PTK AHL Titration kit, soft protective case, replacement sensors, and the full line of standard solutions and buffers – all at a 10% discount when you order online.

Myron L meters are renowned for their accuracy, reliability, and ease of use, and have applications in automatic rinse tank controls, boiler and cooling towers, circuit board cleanliness testing, deionized water, environmental applications, fountain solutions, dialysis, horticulture, hydroponics, ORP (oxidation reduction potential)/Redox, pool and spa, reverse osmosis, textiles.

MyronLMeters.com has a well-established web presence on Facebook, Gravatar, Twitter, Squidoo, LinkedIn, and WordPress. MyronLMeters.com encourages customers to join them on these sites for special offers and discounts.

Tags: MyronLMeters.com, Myron L, Myron L meters, Ultrameter III, conductivity, resistivity, TDS, alkalinity, hardness, saturation index, ORP/free chlorine, pH and temperature, automatic rinse tank controls, boiler and cooling towers, circuit board cleanliness testing, deionized water, environmental applications, fountain solutions, dialysis, horticulture, hydroponics, ORP (oxidation reduction potential)/Redox, pool and spa, reverse osmosis, textiles

Categories : Product Updates

Gardens Cure on the Myron L Ultrameter

Posted by 7 Feb, 2011

Tweethttp://www.gardenscure.com/420/product-reviews/143397-myron-l-ultrameter-6p.html Myron-L Ultrameter 6P permalink Over the years I have spent a lot of money on meters. When I first started I bought $25 meters off of e-bay.. They worked ok and lasted about a year. After realizing how critical it can be to have a reliable meter at times I decided to invest in […]

http://www.gardenscure.com/420/product-reviews/143397-myron-l-ultrameter-6p.html

Myron-L Ultrameter 6P permalink


Over the years I have spent a lot of money on meters. When I first started I bought $25 meters off of e-bay.. They worked ok and lasted about a year. After realizing how critical it can be to have a reliable meter at times I decided to invest in better meters.. I tried most brands out there some of them cost $250-$300.. All of them failed over 1-2 years.. I decided to invest some real money in a meter to get something that was well built ..

At my work there is a water treatment company that treats water for the chillers, cooling towers and the hydronic heating loop. The dude that maintains this is very knowledgeable about water treatment and I saw him taking readings with the Myron-L. I was asking him about it and he said hes had that meter for 5 years and has never replaced the probe. Its still accurate and works properly and he uses it in a commercial application that gets much more use and abuse than growers put their meters through. He probably takes 50 readings a day with it and that water has some crazy oxygen scavengers and biocides in it.

I was sold but the only thing was its … price tag… I bought one anyways about 2 years ago and it works perfect every time.. Im sure I will have this meter for a long time. I read some of the grow journals on here and with as big as some of your gardens are Im sure some of you could afford a meter like this lol. If you want a die hard meter then this is the way to go…

Available now at http://www.myronlmeters.com/ProductDetails.asp?ProductCode=DH-UMII-6PII.

Categories : Uncategorized

6 Tips for Measuring pH of Pure DI Water

Posted by 28 Dec, 2010

TweetMeasuring the pH of pure DI water is easy when you know what to expect. In theory, pure water should have a pH of 7. When you actually measure the pH, it will most likely fall between 5.5 and 7 due to its absorption of CO2 from the atmosphere. This natural occurrence forms carbonic acid […]

Measuring the pH of pure DI water is easy when you know what to expect. In theory, pure water should have a pH of 7. When you actually measure the pH, it will most likely fall between 5.5 and 7 due to its absorption of CO2 from the atmosphere. This natural occurrence forms carbonic acid in the water, lowering the pH. Since DI water is pure, there is nothing to buffer it and stabilize the pH. Below are a few tips to increase the accuracy of your pH measurements.

Tips for accurate pH readings

  1. First and foremost, use a high quality ph meter and ensure that it is properly calibrated with pH buffer solution. Check the manufacturer’s recommendations for calibration. The Ultrameter II 6P and the Techpro II TPH1 are portable pH meters that are extremely accurate and easy to use.
  2. When using a portable pH meter, avoid cross-contamination by thoroughly rinsing with the DI water that you will be sampling. If a glass beaker or cup is to be used, rinse that as well.
  3. Use small samples and minimize exposure to air, as this will lower the pH value. Taking samples from an open-air drum or tank will typically give erroneous readings. Collect samples from a sample port if possible.
  4. If you have access to high-purity reagent grade KCl (Potassium Chloride) salts, then you can buffer the DI water to stabilize the pH. Adding a tiny amount to the pure DI water sample will increase the ionic strength and reduce the absorption of CO2 from the atmosphere. Be careful not to contaminate the KCl salts. Use proper tools/utensils to add the KCl salts
  5. If no salt is available and all you need is a quick check of your system, you can flow the water from a sample port into your portable pH meter to measure the pH values. This will take slightly longer to stabilize. Be sure to use an accurate, waterproof pH meter and hold it closely to the sample port.
  6. Changes in temperature can affect the pH. Use a pH meter that is temperature compensated to remedy this issue.

If you need pH buffer solution, you can find it here at an affordable price.

Categories : Application Advice, Technical Tips