Measuring ORP: MyronLMeters.com

Posted by 12 Apr, 2014

Tweet Ultrapen PT3 ORP tester Though the measurement of free chlorine concentration is often indicated for the disinfection of water and disinfectant byproduct control, there is a better way. Because free chlorine works through oxidation, ORP instrumentation can be used to monitor and control its effectiveness. ORP measures the actual oxidation power of the solution, […]



Ultrapen PT3 ORP tester Ultrapen PT3 ORP tester



Though the measurement of free chlorine concentration is often indicated for the disinfection of water and disinfectant byproduct control, there is a better way. Because free chlorine works through oxidation, ORP instrumentation can be used to monitor and control its effectiveness. ORP measures the actual oxidation power of the solution, specifically the strength and number of oxidation and reduction reactions in solution. This yields a clear picture of the efficacy of the chlorine present, regardless of the concentration or ratio of chlorine species in solution.
Measuring ORP directly reflects the sanitizing power of free chlorine or any other oxidizing or reducing chemicals. The measurement of ORP is precise, empirical and requires no user interpretation, making it ideal for water quality and industrial process control.
What is ORP?
ORP stands for Oxidation Reduction Potential, sometimes called REDOX. ORP is a differential measurement of the mV potentials built up when electrodes are exposed to solutions containing oxidants and reductants. ORP describes the net magnitude and direction of the flow of electrons between pairs of chemical species, called REDOX pairs.
In a REDOX pair, one chemical loses electrons while the other chemical gains electrons. The chemical in the REDOX exchange that acquires electrons is called the oxidant (HOCL, OCl-, ClO2, bromine, hydrogen peroxide, etc.). The chemical in the REDOX exchange that gives up electrons is called the reductant (Li, Mg2, Fe2+, Cr2, etc.). Oxidants acquire electrons through the process of reduction, i.e., they are reduced. Reductants lose their electrons through the process of oxidation, i.e., they become oxidized.
How is ORP measured?
ORP sensors are basically two electrochemical half-cells: A measurement electrode in contact with the solution being measured and a reference electrode in contact with a reservoir of highly concentrated salt solution.
When the solution being measured has a high concentration of oxidizers, it will accept more electrons than it loses so that the measurement electrode develops a higher electrical potential than the reference electrode. A voltmeter placed in line with the two electrodes will display this difference in potential between the two electrodes. Once the entire system reaches equilibrium, the resulting net potential difference represents the ORP. A positive reading indicates an oxidizing solution, and a negative reading indicates a reducing solution. The more positive or negative the value, the more powerful the oxidants or reductants, the greater their concentrations or both.
What does ORP measure?
ORP can be used to determine the efficacy of chemical disinfectants that work via the oxidation or reduction of the structures of microbial contaminants. For example, chlorine, an oxidant, will strip electrons from the negatively charged cell walls of some bacteria. Because ORP measures the total chemical activity of a solution, ORP measures the total efficacy all oxidizing and reducing disinfectants in solution: Hypochlorous acid, monochloramine, dichloramine, hypobromous acid, sodium hypochlorite, UV, ozone, peracetic acid, bromochlorodimethylhydantoin, etc.
ORP indicates the effectiveness of only those disinfectants that work through oxidation and reduction. ORP cannot be used to detect the presence of any one particular chemical or chemical species. Nor can it alone be used to determine the concentration of a known species of chemical in solution. This means that although ORP is the best way to know whether or not your sanitizer is working, it can’t tell you how much or what kind of sanitizer is working.
What factors affect ORP measurement?
While the accuracy of ORP sensors is relatively stable, which is why they do not require calibration, there are factors that affect their response time. Changes in temperature can affect response times by altering the kinetic rates of the reactions being measured, for example. Low temperatures reduce the kinetic rates and lengthen sensor response times.
The condition of the electrode will also alter response times by changing the “exchange current density” (the amount of electrons exchanged per unit area of exposed electrode). The lower the exchange current density, the more sluggish the sensor response. The typical measurement electrode is made from pure platinum (Pt) because it is a noble metal and, therefore, highly unreactive, i.e., the potential being measured is most likely due to the activity of the chemicals in the water and not reactions between the solution and the Pt itself. Even though Pt is a noble metal, it will form a thin oxide layer on the surface of the platinum when exposed to dissolved oxygen. This oxide layer facilitates the ORP measurement when it is very thin, one molecule thick, by attracting, or “adsorbing,” hydrolyzed oxidant or reductant molecules to the surface of the electrode.
Unfortunately, when the oxide layer becomes more than one molecule thick, the resulting lowered exchange current density offsets this benefit. Also, the adsorbed molecules cause a “memory effect.” If a sensor is placed in a less oxidizing solution after measuring a more oxidizing solution, it can take a very long time for the sensor to equilibrate to the new sample. Though the sensor response time is much slower, the final ORP reading will be the same.
ORP electrodes never require recalibration because there is no drift in zero point (as is the case with pH sensors). Any deviation from expected readings is most likely due to surface contamination of the electrodes or buildup of the oxide layer, both of which can easily be remedied by cleaning with a light abrasive, such as Softscrub®. Exposing the sensor to an “ORP conditioning solution” will help reduce the memory effect due to adsorption.
Can ORP be used as a surrogate parameter for free chlorine?
Yes. ORP measures the oxidizing power and, therefore, the actual residual sanitizing strength of the solution being tested. Simply counting how much chlorine is present is misleading because certain changes in water chemistry, such as pH or the addition of cyanuric acid, dramatically alter the oxidizing power of chlorine and, therefore, its efficacy, without changing how much chlorine is present.
When correlated with established disinfection control parameters, measurements and bacterial plate counts, this type of measurement gives a very accurate picture of the sanitizing activity. For this correlation to be valid, the water undergoing treatment must be characterized so that all chemical constituents are known. The pH and temperature values should be reported and held constant. ORP will report an empirical value or a hard number that indicates how active the sanitizer is. However, you have to make certain that microbial contamination is responding to the treatment. Once a correlation is established in a stable system, ORP is a very efficient and effective way to monitor microbial control.
ORP has long been used in bathing waters as the only means for automatic chemical dosing. In fact, the World Health Organization (WHO) suggests an ORP value of between 680-720 mV, depending on the sensor and the particular context, for safe bathing water. In the disinfection of drinking water, an ORP value of ~800 mV is required for oocyst inactivation.
For the purpose of pretreatment screening to detect chlorine levels prior to contact with chlorine-sensitive RO membranes, influent must first be screened to determine which chemicals besides chlorine are present that contribute to the ORP value. With these interferants characterized and pH and temperature held constant, ORP can be correlated to specific sanitizer concentrations, such as chlorine, in their known forms. Some manufacturers of RO membranes and other water quality treatment equipment will also specify an ORP tolerance value for prescreening and influent control. The same holds true of effluent screening.
Why ORP?
ORP is a faster, simpler empirical measurement than titration with DPD or other methods, and in many cases it gives the most accurate picture of the effect of all oxidizing and reducing chemicals in solution. No in-depth knowledge or training is required to obtain accurate repeatable results. User error is virtually eliminated because ORP readings require no subjective, visual interpretation, nor do they require calibration.
Using ORP disinfectant control can be automated because the measurement produces an electrical signal that can trigger switches when outside established control parameters. And ORP sensors are relatively low-maintenance. If you’re not using ORP to monitor and control chemical additions that work through REDOX, you should. You’ll save yourself time, hassle and money.
Myron L Meters is the premier internet retailer of accurate, reliable Myron L meters like the Ultrapen PT3, ORP pen tester.
Categories : Case Studies & Application Stories

DEIONIZED WATER APPLICATIONS: MyronLMeters.com

Posted by 11 Apr, 2014

TweetYears ago, high purity water was used only in limited applications. Today, deionized (Dl) water has become an essential ingredient in hundreds of applications including: medical, laboratory, pharmaceutical, cosmetics, electronics manufacturing, food processing, plating, countless industrial processes, and even the final rinse at the local car wash.THE DEIONIZATION PROCESSThe vast majority of dissolved impurities in […]

Years ago, high purity water was used only in limited applications. Today, deionized (Dl) water has become an essential ingredient in hundreds of applications including: medical, laboratory, pharmaceutical, cosmetics, electronics manufacturing, food processing, plating, countless industrial processes, and even the final rinse at the local car wash.

THE DEIONIZATION PROCESSThe vast majority of dissolved impurities in modern water supplies are ions such as calcium, sodium, chlorides, etc. The deionization process removes ions from water via ion exchange. Positively charged ions (cations) and negatively charged ions (anions) are exchanged for hydrogen (H+) and hydroxyl (OH-) ions, respectively, due to the resin’s greater affinity for other ions. The ion exchange process occurs on the binding sites of the resin beads. Once depleted of exchange capacity, the resin bed is regenerated with concentrated acid and caustic which strips away accumulated ions through physical displacement, leaving hydrogen or hydroxyl ions in their place.

DEIONIZER TYPESDeionizers exist in four basic forms: disposable cartridges, portable exchange tanks, automatic units, and continuous units. A two-bed system employs separate cation and anion resin beds. Mixed-bed deionizers utilize both resins in the same vessel. The highest quality water is produced by mixed-bed deionizers, while two-bed deionizers have a larger capacity. Continuous deionizers, mainly used in labs for polishing, do not require regeneration.

TESTING Dl WATER QUALITYWater quality from deionizers varies with the type of resins used, feed water quality, flow, efficiency of regeneration, remaining capacity, etc. Because of these variables, it is critical in many Dl water applications to know the precise quality. Resistivity/ conductivity is the most convenient method for testing Dl water quality. Deionized pure water is a poor electrical conductor, having a resistivity of 18.2 million ohm-cm (18.2 megohm) and conductivity of 0.055 microsiemens. It is the amount of ionized substances (or salts) dissolved in the water which determines water’s ability to conduct electricity. Therefore, resistivity and its inverse, conductivity, are good general purpose quality parameters.

Because temperature dramatically affects the conductivity of water, conductivity measurements are internationally referenced to 25°C to allow for comparisons of different samples. With typical water supplies, temperature changes the conductivity an average of 2%/°C, which is relatively easy to compensate. Deionized water, however, is much more challenging to accurately measure since temperature effects can approach 10%/°C! Accurate automatic temperature compensation, therefore, is the “heart’ of any respectable instrument.

RECOMMENDED MYRON L METERSPortable instruments are typically used to measure Dl water quality at points of use, pinpoint problems in a Dl system confirm monitor readings, and test the feed water to the system. The handheld Myron L meters have been the first choice of Dl water professionals for many years. For two-bed Dl systems, there are several usable models with displays in either microsiemens or ppm (parts per million) of total dissolved solids. The most versatile instruments for Dl water is the 4P or 6PFCE Ultrameter II™, which can measure both ultrapure mixedbed quality water and unpurified water. It should be noted that once Dl water leaves the piping, its resistivity will drop because the water absorbs dissolved carbon dioxide from the air. Measuring of ultrapure water with a hand-held instrument requires not only the right instrument, but the right technique to obtain accurate, repeatable readings. Myron L meters offer the accuracy and precision necessary for ultrapure water measurements.

Inline Monitor/controllers are generally used in the more demanding Dl water applications. Increased accuracy is realized since the degrading effect of carbon dioxide on high purity water is avoided by use of an in-line sensor (cell). This same degradation of ultrapure water is the reason there are no resistivity calibration standard solutions (as with conductivity instruments). Electronic sensor substitutes are normally used to calibrate resistivity Monitor/controllers.

Myron L Meters carries a variety of inline instruments, including resistivity Monitor/controllers designed specifically for Dl water. Seven resistivity ranges are available to suit any Dl water application: 0-20 megohm, 0-10 megohm, 0-5 megohm, 0-2 megohm, 0-1 megohm, 0-500 kilohm, and 0-200 kilohm. Temperature compensation is automatic and achieved via a dual thermistor circuit. Monitor/controller models contain an internal adjustable set point, piezo alarm connectors and a heavy-duty 10 amp relay circuit which can be used to control an alarm, valves, pump, etc. Available options include 4-20 milliamp output, 3 sensor input, 3 range capability and temperature. Internal electronic sensor substitutes are standard on all Monitor/controllers.

Sensors are available constructed in either 316 stainless steel or titanium. All sensors are provided with a 3/4” MNPT polypropylene bushing and 10 ft./3 meters of cable. Optional PVDF or stainless steel bushings can be ordered, as well as longer cable lengths up to 100 ft./30 meters.

The following table briefly covers recommended Myron L meters for Dl water applications.

DEIONIZED WATER APP TABLE

Capture

 

MyronLMeters.com is the premier internet retailer for all recommended Myron L meters above. Save 10% when you order online at MyronLMeters.com.

Categories : Uncategorized

DEIONIZED WATER APPLICATIONS: MyronLMeters.com

Posted by 11 Apr, 2014

TweetYears ago, high purity water was used only in limited applications. Today, deionized (Dl) water has become an essential ingredient in hundreds of applications including: medical, laboratory, pharmaceutical, cosmetics, electronics manufacturing, food processing, plating, countless industrial processes, and even the final rinse at the local car wash. THE DEIONIZATION PROCESS The vast majority of dissolved […]

Years ago, high purity water was used only in limited applications. Today, deionized (Dl) water has become an essential ingredient in hundreds of applications including: medical, laboratory, pharmaceutical, cosmetics, electronics manufacturing, food processing, plating, countless industrial processes, and even the final rinse at the local car wash.

THE DEIONIZATION PROCESS
The vast majority of dissolved impurities in modern water supplies are ions such as calcium, sodium, chlorides, etc. The deionization process removes ions from water via ion exchange. Positively charged ions (cations) and negatively charged ions (anions) are exchanged for hydrogen (H+) and hydroxyl (OH-) ions, respectively, due to the resin’s greater affinity for other ions. The ion exchange process occurs on the binding sites of the resin beads. Once depleted of exchange capacity, the resin bed is regenerated with concentrated acid and caustic which strips away accumulated ions through physical displacement, leaving hydrogen or hydroxyl ions in their place.

DEIONIZER TYPES
Deionizers exist in four basic forms: disposable cartridges, portable exchange tanks, automatic units, and continuous units. A two-bed system employs separate cation and anion resin beds. Mixed-bed deionizers utilize both resins in the same vessel. The highest quality water is produced by mixed-bed deionizers, while two-bed deionizers have a larger capacity. Continuous deionizers, mainly used in labs for polishing, do not require regeneration.

TESTING Dl WATER QUALITY
Water quality from deionizers varies with the type of resins used, feed water quality, flow, efficiency of regeneration, remaining capacity, etc. Because of these variables, it is critical in many Dl water applications to know the precise quality. Resistivity/ conductivity is the most convenient method for testing Dl water quality. Deionized pure water is a poor electrical conductor, having a resistivity of 18.2 million ohm-cm (18.2 megohm) and conductivity of 0.055 microsiemens. It is the amount of ionized substances (or salts) dissolved in the water which determines water’s ability to conduct electricity. Therefore, resistivity and its inverse, conductivity, are good general purpose quality parameters.

Because temperature dramatically affects the conductivity of water, conductivity measurements are internationally referenced to 25°C to allow for comparisons of different samples. With typical water supplies, temperature changes the conductivity an average of 2%/°C, which is relatively easy to compensate. Deionized water, however, is much more challenging to accurately measure since temperature effects can approach 10%/°C! Accurate automatic temperature compensation, therefore, is the “heart’ of any respectable instrument.

RECOMMENDED MYRON L METERS
Portable instruments are typically used to measure Dl water quality at points of use, pinpoint problems in a Dl system confirm monitor readings, and test the feed water to the system. The handheld Myron L meters have been the first choice of Dl water professionals for many years. For two-bed Dl systems, there are several usable models with displays in either microsiemens or ppm (parts per million) of total dissolved solids. The most versatile instruments for Dl water is the 4P or 6PFCE Ultrameter II™, which can measure both ultrapure mixedbed quality water and unpurified water. It should be noted that once Dl water leaves the piping, its resistivity will drop because the water absorbs dissolved carbon dioxide from the air. Measuring of ultrapure water with a hand-held instrument requires not only the right instrument, but the right technique to obtain accurate, repeatable readings. Myron L meters offer the accuracy and precision necessary for ultrapure water measurements.

Inline Monitor/controllers are generally used in the more demanding Dl water applications. Increased accuracy is realized since the degrading effect of carbon dioxide on high purity water is avoided by use of an in-line sensor (cell). This same degradation of ultrapure water is the reason there are no resistivity calibration standard solutions (as with conductivity instruments). Electronic sensor substitutes are normally used to calibrate resistivity Monitor/controllers.

Myron L Meters carries a variety of inline instruments, including resistivity Monitor/controllers designed specifically for Dl water. Seven resistivity ranges are available to suit any Dl water application: 0-20 megohm, 0-10 megohm, 0-5 megohm, 0-2 megohm, 0-1 megohm, 0-500 kilohm, and 0-200 kilohm. Temperature compensation is automatic and achieved via a dual thermistor circuit. Monitor/controller models contain an internal adjustable set point, piezo alarm connectors and a heavy-duty 10 amp relay circuit which can be used to control an alarm, valves, pump, etc. Available options include 4-20 milliamp output, 3 sensor input, 3 range capability and temperature. Internal electronic sensor substitutes are standard on all Monitor/controllers.

Sensors are available constructed in either 316 stainless steel or titanium. All sensors are provided with a 3/4″ MNPT polypropylene bushing and 10 ft./3 meters of cable. Optional PVDF or stainless steel bushings can be ordered, as well as longer cable lengths up to 100 ft./30 meters.

The following table briefly covers recommended Myron L meters for Dl water applications.

DEIONIZED WATER APP TABLE

Capture

 

MyronLMeters.com is the premier internet retailer for all recommended Myron L meters above. Save 10% when you order online at MyronLMeters.com.

Categories : Application Advice, Case Studies & Application Stories, Product Updates, Science and Industry Updates, Technical Tips

New Ultrapen Resources: MyronLMeters.com

Posted by 8 Apr, 2014

Tweet  New Ultrapen Resources New Ultrapen Resources YouTube, Myron L Meters Blog, and Product Pages At Myron L Meters, we’ve been busy lately updating our YouTube Channel to bring you the latest product overviews, calibration, care and maintenance, and product features videos. We’ve been keeping them short and focused because we know you’re busy. We’re […]

 

New Ultrapen Resources


New Ultrapen Resources

YouTube, Myron L Meters Blog, and Product Pages

At Myron L Meters, we’ve been busy lately updating our YouTube Channel to bring you the latest product overviews, calibration, care and maintenance, and product features videos. We’ve been keeping them short and focused because we know you’re busy. We’re creating similar blog posts so you will always have your choice of video instruction overview and handy print reference. Have suggestions for videos?  Would you like a branded video for your company? Let us know at MyronLMeters@gmail.com.

Myron L Meters presents a review of the Ultrapen PT2 that measures pH. In this video, we cover the steps for measuring pH, changing the temperature setting, changing the pH measurement mode, and overall features.

Click to find out how!
“The Ultrapen PT2 is compact, reliable, easy to use and so far seems very durable while riding in its carry case between measurements. I use it daily and it reliably delivers PH and temperature.”
Calibration of the Ultrapen PT3 ORP Pen
The factory recommends calibrating twice a month, depending on usage. However, you should check the calibration whenever measurements are not as expected.
NOTE: If the measurement is NOT within calibration limits for any reason, “Error” will display. Check to make sure you are using a proper ORP calibration solution. If the solution is correct, clean the sensor as described im the manual under Routine Maintenance. (Reconditioning the sensor should not be necessary due to the high ionic strength of the calibration solutions.) Restart calibration.
NOTE: Small bubbles trapped in the sensor may give a false calibration. After calibration is completed, measure the ORP calibration solution again to verify correct calibration. Remember, in measurement mode you must manually correct for temperature variance from 25ºC. Example: At 25ºC, ORP2602OZ calibration solution will read 260mV; however, at 20.0ºC ORP2602OZ will read 265mV.
NOTE: If at any point during calibration, you do not submerge the sensor in solution
before the flashing slows, allow the PT3 to turn off and start over.
READ MORE
Our Ultrapen PT1 product overview video has been embedded on a Russian water products company website.


Want to stay up-to-date with Myron L Meters products?  Check out our blog and subscribe to our YouTube Channel.  You’ll get the latest maintenance tips, product updates, and more…
Cool Customers
At Myron L Meters, we think all of our customers are cool, but when this guy ordered an Ultrameter II 6P we thought it was VERY cool. Thank you, Jason Statham. It just goes to show you that – even if you’re expendable – you want your meter to last.
You’ll find our complete selection of Ultrapens HERE.
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Categories : Care and Maintenance, Product Updates, Technical Tips, Videos

New Ultrapen Resources: MyronLMeters.com

Posted by 8 Apr, 2014

Tweet New Ultrapen Resources New Ultrapen Resources YouTube, Myron L Meters Blog, and Product Pages At Myron L Meters, we’ve been busy lately updating our YouTube Channel to bring you the latest product overviews, calibration, care and maintenance, and product features videos. We’ve been keeping them short and focused because we know you’re busy. We’re […]



New Ultrapen Resources


New Ultrapen Resources

YouTube, Myron L Meters Blog, and Product Pages

At Myron L Meters, we’ve been busy lately updating our YouTube Channel to bring you the latest product overviews, calibration, care and maintenance, and product features videos. We’ve been keeping them short and focused because we know you’re busy. We’re creating similar blog posts so you will always have your choice of video instruction overview and handy print reference. Have suggestions for videos?  Would you like a branded video for your company? Let us know at MyronLMeters@gmail.com.

Myron L Meters presents a review of the Ultrapen PT2 that measures pH. In this video, we cover the steps for measuring pH, changing the temperature setting, changing the pH measurement mode, and overall features.


Click to find out how!
“The Ultrapen PT2 is compact, reliable, easy to use and so far seems very durable while riding in its carry case between measurements. I use it daily and it reliably delivers PH and temperature.”
Calibration of the Ultrapen PT3 ORP Pen
The factory recommends calibrating twice a month, depending on usage. However, you should check the calibration whenever measurements are not as expected.
NOTE: If the measurement is NOT within calibration limits for any reason, “Error” will display. Check to make sure you are using a proper ORP calibration solution. If the solution is correct, clean the sensor as described im the manual under Routine Maintenance. (Reconditioning the sensor should not be necessary due to the high ionic strength of the calibration solutions.) Restart calibration.
NOTE: Small bubbles trapped in the sensor may give a false calibration. After calibration is completed, measure the ORP calibration solution again to verify correct calibration. Remember, in measurement mode you must manually correct for temperature variance from 25ºC. Example: At 25ºC, ORP2602OZ calibration solution will read 260mV; however, at 20.0ºC ORP2602OZ will read 265mV.
NOTE: If at any point during calibration, you do not submerge the sensor in solution
before the flashing slows, allow the PT3 to turn off and start over.READ MORE
Our Ultrapen PT1 product overview video has been embedded on a Russian water products company website.
Want to stay up-to-date with Myron L Meters products?  Check out our blog and subscribe to our YouTube Channel.  You’ll get the latest maintenance tips, product updates, and more…
Cool CustomersAt Myron L Meters, we think all of our customers are cool, but when this guy ordered an Ultrameter II 6P we thought it was VERY cool. Thank you, Jason Statham. It just goes to show you that – even if you’re expendable – you want your meter to last.
You’ll find our complete selection of Ultrapens HERE.
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Categories : Uncategorized

Reverse Osmosis: MyronLMeters.com

Posted by 7 Apr, 2014

Tweet Reverse Osmosis   RO Meter – RO-1: 0-1250 ppm with color band RO Meters The choice of professionals for years, this compact instrument has been designed specifically to demonstrate and test Point of Use (POU) reverse osmosis or distillation systems. By measuring electrical conductivity, it will quickly determine the parts per million/Total Dissolved Solids […]



Reverse Osmosis



 

RO Meter – RO-1: 0-1250 ppm with color band
RO Meters
The choice of professionals for years, this compact instrument has been designed specifically to demonstrate and test Point of Use (POU) reverse osmosis or distillation systems. By measuring electrical conductivity, it will quickly determine the parts per million/Total Dissolved Solids (ppm/TDS) of any drinking water.
With a single ‘before and after’ test, this handy device effectively demonstrates how your RO or distillation system eliminates harmful dissolved solids. It will also service test systems, including membrane evaluation programs.Save $25.00 on the Ro-1 this month with coupon code: ROSave25

 

Ultrameter II – 6PIIConductivity, TDS, Salinity, pH, ORP, Temp Pens

Reverse osmosis biofouling

Introduction
Water desalination via reverse osmosis (RO) technology provides a solution to the world’s water shortage problem. Until now, the production of fresh water from seawater has reached 21-million cubic meter per day all around the world (Wangnick, 2005). However, the success of RO technology is subject to improvement as the technology is challenged by a biofouling problem –a problem related to biological material development which forms a sticky layer on the membrane surface (Flemming, 1997; Baker and Dudley, 1998).
Continuous biofouling problems in RO lead to higher energy input requirement as an effect of increased biofilm resistance (Rf) and biofilm enhanced osmotic pressure (BEOP), lower quality of product water due to concentration polarization (CP) – increased concentration due to solutes accumulation on the membrane surface, (Herzberg and Elimelech, 2007), and thus significant increase in both operating and maintenance costs.
Recent studies and objectives
Recent studies show the importance of the operating conditions (e.g. flux and cross flow velocities) in RO biofouling. The presence of feed channel spacers has also been getting more attention as it may have adverse effects. A previous study (Chong et al., 2008) without feed channel spacers showed that RO biofouling was a flux driven process where higher flux increased fouling rate.

READ MORE

 

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ULTRAPEN Set – PT1, PT2, & PT3


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Categories : Uncategorized

Reverse Osmosis: MyronLMeters.com

Posted by 7 Apr, 2014

Tweet  Reverse Osmosis   RO Meter – RO-1: 0-1250 ppm with color band RO Meters The choice of professionals for years, this compact instrument has been designed specifically to demonstrate and test Point of Use (POU) reverse osmosis or distillation systems. By measuring electrical conductivity, it will quickly determine the parts per million/Total Dissolved Solids […]

 

Reverse Osmosis


 

RO Meter – RO-1: 0-1250 ppm with color band

RO Meters
The choice of professionals for years, this compact instrument has been designed specifically to demonstrate and test Point of Use (POU) reverse osmosis or distillation systems. By measuring electrical conductivity, it will quickly determine the parts per million/Total Dissolved Solids (ppm/TDS) of any drinking water.
With a single ‘before and after’ test, this handy device effectively demonstrates how your RO or distillation system eliminates harmful dissolved solids. It will also service test systems, including membrane evaluation programs.Save $25.00 on the Ro-1 this month with coupon code: ROSave25

 

Ultrameter II – 6PIIConductivity, TDS, Salinity, pH, ORP, Temp Pens

Reverse osmosis biofouling

Introduction
Water desalination via reverse osmosis (RO) technology provides a solution to the world’s water shortage problem. Until now, the production of fresh water from seawater has reached 21-million cubic meter per day all around the world (Wangnick, 2005). However, the success of RO technology is subject to improvement as the technology is challenged by a biofouling problem –a problem related to biological material development which forms a sticky layer on the membrane surface (Flemming, 1997; Baker and Dudley, 1998).
Continuous biofouling problems in RO lead to higher energy input requirement as an effect of increased biofilm resistance (Rf) and biofilm enhanced osmotic pressure (BEOP), lower quality of product water due to concentration polarization (CP) – increased concentration due to solutes accumulation on the membrane surface, (Herzberg and Elimelech, 2007), and thus significant increase in both operating and maintenance costs.

Recent studies and objectives
Recent studies show the importance of the operating conditions (e.g. flux and cross flow velocities) in RO biofouling. The presence of feed channel spacers has also been getting more attention as it may have adverse effects. A previous study (Chong et al., 2008) without feed channel spacers showed that RO biofouling was a flux driven process where higher flux increased fouling rate.

READ MORE

 

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ULTRAPEN Set – PT1, PT2, & PT3

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Categories : Application Advice, Case Studies & Application Stories, Science and Industry Updates, Technical Tips

New FAQ Section: MyronLMeters.com

Posted by 7 Apr, 2014

Tweet Myron L Meters Improved FAQ FAQ pages should be a simple, and quick, way to share answers to common questions held by visitors and customers. A good FAQ page should always be helpful to us and our customers. Our new FAQ section will feature straightforward answers, organized video links, links to blog posts, and […]

Myron L Meters Improved FAQ

FAQ pages should be a simple, and quick, way to share answers to common questions held by visitors and customers. A good FAQ page should always be helpful to us and our customers.

Our new FAQ section will feature straightforward answers, organized video links, links to blog posts, and site links to manuals and reference material.
We’ll feature helpful how-to videos like the ones below.

Click here for a preview of how it will be organized, and keep your questions and suggestions coming to info@myronlmeters.com.

 

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Video: How to Replace an Ultrameter pH Sensor myron-l-meters-ultrameter-ii-6p-ph-sensor-replacement_thumbnail.jpg
Video: How to Select an Inline Monitor /Controllerhow-to-select-an-inline-water-quality-monitor-controller-for-your-water-system-myron-l-meters_thumbnail.jpg
Video: Myron L Ultrapen PT-1 Product Overviewultrapen-pt1-product-overview-video_thumbnail.jpg

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New FAQ Section: MyronLMeters.com

Posted by 7 Apr, 2014

Tweet Myron L Meters Improved FAQ FAQ pages should be a simple, and quick, way to share answers to common questions held by visitors and customers. A good FAQ page should always be helpful to us and our customers.Our new FAQ section will feature straightforward answers, organized video links, links to blog posts, and site […]




Myron L Meters Improved FAQ

FAQ pages should be a simple, and quick, way to share answers to common questions held by visitors and customers. A good FAQ page should always be helpful to us and our customers.

Our new FAQ section will feature straightforward answers, organized video links, links to blog posts, and site links to manuals and reference material.We’ll feature helpful how-to videos like the ones below.

Click here for a preview of how it will be organized, and keep your questions and suggestions coming to info@myronlmeters.com.

 

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Video: How to Replace an Ultrameter pH Sensor myron-l-meters-ultrameter-ii-6p-ph-sensor-replacement_thumbnail.jpg
Video: How to Select an Inline Monitor /Controllerhow-to-select-an-inline-water-quality-monitor-controller-for-your-water-system-myron-l-meters_thumbnail.jpg
Video: Myron L Ultrapen PT-1 Product Overviewultrapen-pt1-product-overview-video_thumbnail.jpg


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Categories : Uncategorized

Where You Can Find Myron L Meters: MyronLMeters.com

Posted by 7 Apr, 2014

Tweet Where You Can Find us How to Find Myron L Meters You’ll find us in some of the largest dialysis clinics in America. We’re testing some great pools. We’re testing soil on the farm. We’re helping keep your drinking water clean. We’re at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. And we’re always here when you […]



Where You Can Find us



How to Find Myron L Meters

You’ll find us in some of the largest dialysis clinics in America.
We’re testing some great pools.
We’re testing soil on the farm.
We’re helping keep your drinking water clean.
We’re at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center.
And we’re always here when you need us, with great products, technical support, literature, videos, and industry resources. Clicking any picture will help you find us.
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Copyright © , All rights reserved.Our mailing address is:

 

Categories : Uncategorized