Archive for June, 2012

Myron L Meters Thanks Oak Ridge National Laboratory!

Posted by 15 Jun, 2012

Tweet Molecular machinery Synthetic biology, nanostructures could boost biofuel production Over the centuries humans have used microorganisms for activities from making wine and beer to baking bread. Common microorganisms like yeast and bacteria can carry out surprisingly complex chemical transformations in the space of a few nanometers. Today, scientists working in the field of synthetic […]

Qr_code

Molecular machinery

Synthetic biology, nanostructures could boost biofuel production

Over the centuries humans have used microorganisms for activities from making wine and beer to baking bread. Common microorganisms like yeast and bacteria can carry out surprisingly complex chemical transformations in the space of a few nanometers. Today, scientists working in the field of synthetic biology are developing methods of modifying and controlling the molecular machinery within these organisms. Their goal is creating nanoscale chemical factories that are more efficient than aditional production methods and can be easily modified and eproduced.One of these eforts, aimed at boosting the efficiencyf biofuel production, is a collaboration between ORNL physicist Miguel Fuentes-Cabrera and Qing Lin, associate professor of chemistry at the University at Bufalo, The State University of New York.

Investigating microcompartments

The pair’s research, begun under a grant from the Keck Foundation, is focused on transplanting the chemical processing capability of nanoscale bacterial structures called microcompartments into a strain of yeast used in commercial biofuel production. “These microcompartments usually have a specialized function associated with cellular metabolism,” Lin says. “The structures act like completely isolated entities—small machines within a big factory,” Fuentes-Cabrera adds. “They take material from the host bacteria, perform various enzyme-catalyzed metabolic reactions, and then release the resulting products into the host organism.”

“For example,” Lin says, “we know that under certain conditions bacteria use microcompartments to convert ethanolamine to acetaldehyde and ammonia for nourishment. By performing this essential metabolic function in a segregated compartment, the bacteria are able to tolerate levels of acetaldehyde which would otherwise be toxic. Because the ethanol production pathway in yeast also involves acetaldehyde, we thought a good way to demonstrate the potential of these microcompartments would be to import them into yeast to boost ethanol production and improve ethanol tolerance. That’s the goal we’re working toward.”

Both researchers note that the ability to engineer these organisms to produce ethanol, propanol or other biofuels hinges on gaining access to the chemical processing capabilities of the nano-sized microcompartments—and that requires understanding how molecules move in and out of these structures.

Understand then modify

Computer simulations may hold the key to understanding the ins and outs of microcompartments. That’s where Fuentes-Cabrera’s primary contribution to the collaboration comes into play. The simulated microcompartments he creates not only improve the general understanding of these structures, but also help Lin’s team determine how to proceed in unlocking their function.

Microcompartments are made of collections of proteins, which include a number of pores. Some researchers suggest that these pores act like “gates” that allow molecules to move in and out; however, they’re not sure what causes the pores to open and close. The gates could be regulated by metabolites—materials produced by the bacterium during digestion and other chemical processes—in reaction to concentrations of these materials within the cell. “That’s what our simulation is helping to determine,” Fuentes-Cabrera says. “There is a lot of speculation as to how metabolites are transported through the microcompartments.” His post-doctoral assistant, Yungok Ihm, is investigating this process by creating a simulation of ions and metabolites passing through the pores in the microcompartments.

Once they understand how molecules are transported in and out of the compartments, Fuentes-Cabrera and Lin plan to turn their attention to understanding other aspects of the structures. Using simulations, Fuentes-Cabrera will investigate the proteins that spontaneously self-assemble into the microcompartments. For his part, Lin will attempt to introduce new enzymes into the interior of the microcompartments to enable the production of ethanol or propanol. “The critical fist step is to determine whether the native metabolic pathway present in these structures can be re-engineered to facilitate the bioethanol production,” Lin says. “First we understand, then we modify,” Fuentes-Cabrera says.

Bacteria to yeast

If the biofuels production capability of microcompartments can be achieved in bacteria, Lin’s goal is to reproduce the same process genetically in yeast used to produce biofuels. Providing yeast with the added metabolic capability of microcompartments could reduce the number of steps involved in the biofuels production process and, therefore, its cost.

However, genetically engineering new qualities into an organism can be problematic. “Often when researchers try to genetically modify an organism to do something that it doesn’t normally do, it dies,” Fuentes-Cabrera says. Despite that note of caution, he and Lin feel they have a good chance of having bacterial microcompartments work in yeast because of their self-contained nature. He explains this optimism by pointing to the fact that all of the engineered metabolic reactions occur within the confines of the microcompartments. “We are more confident of success because we are not interfering with the yeast’s normal metabolic processes,” he says.

So far, the two researchers have been able to express the five compartment-related proteins in yeast. Their assumption is that, once expressed, these proteins should spontaneously assemble themselves into microcompartments—which is what occurs in bacteria. The researchers are now in the process of isolating the potential microcompartments from the yeast in order to study them using transmission electron microscopy. To gain additional molecular-level insight into the protein self-assembly, they are also using simulations to model the interactions among the proteins. “When we have a better understanding of how the proteins interact,” says Fuentes-Cabrera, “we will be able to suggest genetic modifications to facilitate the self-assembly process.”

Biological advantage

Both Fuentes-Cabrera and Lin maintain that biofuel production is just one of many potential applications of this relatively new facet of synthetic biology. They emphasize that one of the goals of the field is to learn from nature and then apply what you have learned to your advantage. “In this case,” Fuentes-Cabrera says, “we are showing that we can harness natural biological processes to provide us with technologies we need. Much of the system we are working with occurs naturally. We didn’t have to invent it. It was already there.”

Lin notes that the biggest advantage of a purely biological approach to biofuel production over those using artificial or manufactured components is the ease with which changes to the system can be implemented. “Because microcompartments are naturally produced by certain microorganisms,” Lin says, “they are part of a genetically encoded system. If we want microcompartments to do other tasks, we can simply modify the genes that control the biological parts in the system and scale up the production by growing more microorganisms. Ramping up production for a new generation of nanomaterials, on the other hand, could be far more difficult.”— Jim Pearce

Myron L Meters is proud to do business with Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

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Categories : Uncategorized

Myron L Meters Thanks Culligan!

Posted by 15 Jun, 2012

Tweet [[posterous-content:pid___0]] Culligan has 70 years experience as a global provider of end-to-end water treatment solutions for a variety of industries—including food and beverage, oil and gas, energy and power, healthcare/hospitals/bio-pharmaceutical, manufacturing and municipal drinking water. From the water used in oil field steam injection, to the high-purity water used in pharmaceutical production—Culligan answers the […]

[[posterous-content:pid___0]]

Culligan has 70 years experience as a global provider of end-to-end water treatment solutions for a variety of industries—including food and beverage, oil and gas, energy and power, healthcare/hospitals/bio-pharmaceutical, manufacturing and municipal drinking water. From the water used in oil field steam injection, to the high-purity water used in pharmaceutical production—Culligan answers the distinct needs of industrial customers with an individualized approach through on-site surveys, analysis and service.

Culligan knows your individual needs cannot change to suit an “off-the-shelf” water treatment system. This inspired the revolutionary modular platform of Culligan Matrix Solutions, designed to address your particular water treatment concerns within your budget, time frame, and sustainability goals.

Culligan Matrix Solutions flexibility encourages overall improved efficiency:

Reduce maintenance costs with reliable service from certified technicians

Reduce energy costs and consumption with a system designed to your unique needs

Minimize wastewater by reusing gray water

Maximize production time with one of the fastest complete systems to market

For more information view industrial general capabilities brochure.

Learn more about the results Culligan Matrix Solutions can provide your industry:

Food & Beverage Production

Oil & Gas

Energy & Power

Healthcare/Hospitals/Bio-pharmaceutical

Manufacturing

Municipal Drinking Water

Myron L Meters is proud to do business with Culligan.

Please visit us on the web at:

http://www.myronlmeters.com

Facebook:  

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Myron-L-Meters/147455608645777

Google +:    

https://plus.google.com/112342237119950323462

Twitter:      

http://twitter.com/MyronLMeters

Linkedin:    

http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=98473409&trk=tab_pro

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News:          

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Categories : Uncategorized

Myron L Meters Thanks Oak Ridge National Laboratory!

Posted by 15 Jun, 2012

Tweet Molecular machinery Synthetic biology, nanostructures could boost biofuel production Over the centuries humans have used microorganisms for activities from making wine and beer to baking bread. Common microorganisms like yeast and bacteria can carry out surprisingly complex chemical transformations in the space of a few nanometers. Today, scientists working in the field of synthetic […]

Qr_code

Molecular machinery

Synthetic biology, nanostructures could boost biofuel production

Over the centuries humans have used microorganisms for activities from making wine and beer to baking bread. Common microorganisms like yeast and bacteria can carry out surprisingly complex chemical transformations in the space of a few nanometers. Today, scientists working in the field of synthetic biology are developing methods of modifying and controlling the molecular machinery within these organisms. Their goal is creating nanoscale chemical factories that are more efficient than aditional production methods and can be easily modified and eproduced.One of these eforts, aimed at boosting the efficiencyf biofuel production, is a collaboration between ORNL physicist Miguel Fuentes-Cabrera and Qing Lin, associate professor of chemistry at the University at Bufalo, The State University of New York.

Investigating microcompartments

The pair’s research, begun under a grant from the Keck Foundation, is focused on transplanting the chemical processing capability of nanoscale bacterial structures called microcompartments into a strain of yeast used in commercial biofuel production. “These microcompartments usually have a specialized function associated with cellular metabolism,” Lin says. “The structures act like completely isolated entities—small machines within a big factory,” Fuentes-Cabrera adds. “They take material from the host bacteria, perform various enzyme-catalyzed metabolic reactions, and then release the resulting products into the host organism.”

“For example,” Lin says, “we know that under certain conditions bacteria use microcompartments to convert ethanolamine to acetaldehyde and ammonia for nourishment. By performing this essential metabolic function in a segregated compartment, the bacteria are able to tolerate levels of acetaldehyde which would otherwise be toxic. Because the ethanol production pathway in yeast also involves acetaldehyde, we thought a good way to demonstrate the potential of these microcompartments would be to import them into yeast to boost ethanol production and improve ethanol tolerance. That’s the goal we’re working toward.”

Both researchers note that the ability to engineer these organisms to produce ethanol, propanol or other biofuels hinges on gaining access to the chemical processing capabilities of the nano-sized microcompartments—and that requires understanding how molecules move in and out of these structures.

Understand then modify

Computer simulations may hold the key to understanding the ins and outs of microcompartments. That’s where Fuentes-Cabrera’s primary contribution to the collaboration comes into play. The simulated microcompartments he creates not only improve the general understanding of these structures, but also help Lin’s team determine how to proceed in unlocking their function.

Microcompartments are made of collections of proteins, which include a number of pores. Some researchers suggest that these pores act like “gates” that allow molecules to move in and out; however, they’re not sure what causes the pores to open and close. The gates could be regulated by metabolites—materials produced by the bacterium during digestion and other chemical processes—in reaction to concentrations of these materials within the cell. “That’s what our simulation is helping to determine,” Fuentes-Cabrera says. “There is a lot of speculation as to how metabolites are transported through the microcompartments.” His post-doctoral assistant, Yungok Ihm, is investigating this process by creating a simulation of ions and metabolites passing through the pores in the microcompartments.

Once they understand how molecules are transported in and out of the compartments, Fuentes-Cabrera and Lin plan to turn their attention to understanding other aspects of the structures. Using simulations, Fuentes-Cabrera will investigate the proteins that spontaneously self-assemble into the microcompartments. For his part, Lin will attempt to introduce new enzymes into the interior of the microcompartments to enable the production of ethanol or propanol. “The critical fist step is to determine whether the native metabolic pathway present in these structures can be re-engineered to facilitate the bioethanol production,” Lin says. “First we understand, then we modify,” Fuentes-Cabrera says.

Bacteria to yeast

If the biofuels production capability of microcompartments can be achieved in bacteria, Lin’s goal is to reproduce the same process genetically in yeast used to produce biofuels. Providing yeast with the added metabolic capability of microcompartments could reduce the number of steps involved in the biofuels production process and, therefore, its cost.

However, genetically engineering new qualities into an organism can be problematic. “Often when researchers try to genetically modify an organism to do something that it doesn’t normally do, it dies,” Fuentes-Cabrera says. Despite that note of caution, he and Lin feel they have a good chance of having bacterial microcompartments work in yeast because of their self-contained nature. He explains this optimism by pointing to the fact that all of the engineered metabolic reactions occur within the confines of the microcompartments. “We are more confident of success because we are not interfering with the yeast’s normal metabolic processes,” he says.

So far, the two researchers have been able to express the five compartment-related proteins in yeast. Their assumption is that, once expressed, these proteins should spontaneously assemble themselves into microcompartments—which is what occurs in bacteria. The researchers are now in the process of isolating the potential microcompartments from the yeast in order to study them using transmission electron microscopy. To gain additional molecular-level insight into the protein self-assembly, they are also using simulations to model the interactions among the proteins. “When we have a better understanding of how the proteins interact,” says Fuentes-Cabrera, “we will be able to suggest genetic modifications to facilitate the self-assembly process.”

Biological advantage

Both Fuentes-Cabrera and Lin maintain that biofuel production is just one of many potential applications of this relatively new facet of synthetic biology. They emphasize that one of the goals of the field is to learn from nature and then apply what you have learned to your advantage. “In this case,” Fuentes-Cabrera says, “we are showing that we can harness natural biological processes to provide us with technologies we need. Much of the system we are working with occurs naturally. We didn’t have to invent it. It was already there.”

Lin notes that the biggest advantage of a purely biological approach to biofuel production over those using artificial or manufactured components is the ease with which changes to the system can be implemented. “Because microcompartments are naturally produced by certain microorganisms,” Lin says, “they are part of a genetically encoded system. If we want microcompartments to do other tasks, we can simply modify the genes that control the biological parts in the system and scale up the production by growing more microorganisms. Ramping up production for a new generation of nanomaterials, on the other hand, could be far more difficult.”— Jim Pearce

Myron L Meters is proud to do business with Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Please visit us on the web at:

http://www.myronlmeters.com

Facebook:  

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Myron-L-Meters/147455608645777

Google +:    

https://plus.google.com/112342237119950323462

Twitter:      

http://twitter.com/MyronLMeters

Linkedin:    

http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=98473409&trk=tab_pro

Pinterest:    

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YouTube:    

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News:          

http://waterindustrynews.com

 

Categories : Uncategorized

Myron L Meters Thanks Evans Chemetics!

Posted by 14 Jun, 2012

Tweet The Company 1938 Dr. Ralph L. Evans founded “Proprietary Products Laboratories” in Hoboken, NJ. In 1943 the company relocated to Waterloo, NY, and in 1949 was renamed to EVANS CHEMETICS INC.1978 Evans Chemetics was sold to W.R. Grace and Company. In 1992 the Organic Chemicals Division of W.R. Grace including the Evans Chemetics business was acquired by […]

Ah-ds-ep-10-2t

The Company


1938 Dr. Ralph L. Evans founded “Proprietary Products Laboratories” in Hoboken, NJ. In 1943 the company relocated to Waterloo, NY, and in 1949 was renamed to EVANS CHEMETICS INC.1978 Evans Chemetics was sold to W.R. Grace and Company. In 1992 the Organic Chemicals Division of 
W.R. Grace including the Evans Chemetics business was acquired by Vestar Capital Partners forming Hampshire Chemical Corporation which in 1995 was taken over by Sentrachem, Southafrica. In 1998 Sentrachem was acquired by The Dow Chemical Corporation and Hampshire Chemical Corp. became a fully owned subsidiary.

Finally on Sept 19, 2005, BRUNO BOCK CHEMISCHE FABRIK GMBH & CO. KG, Germany, acquired the Evans Chemetics business unit with its production site in Waterloo, NY, through its fully owned subsidiary EVANS CHEMETICS LP with its office now in Teaneck, NJ. BRUNO BOCK restored the old company name as it has an exceptional reputation in the whole industry. BRUNO BOCK was founded in 1937 by Bruno Bock and is still privately owned.Since January 1, 2008, BRUNO BOCK acts also as “Only Representative” of EVANS CHEMETICS LP according the European Regulation 1907/2006 (REACH Regulation), article 8. Those products EVANS CHEMETICS sells directly or indirectly in the countries of the European Community are preregistered and will be registered depending on their tonnage in the years 2010, 2013 and 2018. See also www.brunobock.de



    Glenpointe Center, Teaneck, NJ, with EVANS CHEMETICS LP office on 4th Floor


EVANS CHEMETICS manufactures ORGANIC DIVALENT SULFUR CHEMICALS and is now together with BRUNO BOCK as parent company the worldwide leading producer of Thioglycolic Acid (CAS# 68-11-1) andMercaptopropionic Acid (CAS# 107-96-0) and their derivitives. 
Additionally Thiodipropionic Acid (CAS# 111-17-1), and its derivatives are produced as antioxidants.
EVANS CHEMETICS also manufactures a large number of specialty sulfur chemicals being the worldwide leading producer of Thioglycerol (CAS# 96-27-5)Ethanolamine Sulfite (CAS# 15535-29-2)
Sulfoethyl Methacrylate (CAS# 10595-80-9) and others. Our products find applications in hair care, cosmetics, food packaging, food additive, pharmaceuticals, plastics, and many other uses.We at EVANS CHEMETICS maintain with an innovative and highly skilled lean organization and long, steady and successful experiences in the global marketplace a commitment to our esteemed customer base. 
In this regard, our foremost goal is to provide unmatched quality and undivided dedication to our customers.


Our product line is flexible and reliable. Sustainability of our products drives us continuously to development of better qualities with improved processes under permanent control of our environment.

Myron L Meters is proud to do business with Evans Chemetics.

Please visit us on the web at:

http://www.myronlmeters.com

Facebook:  

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Myron-L-Meters/147455608645777

Google +:    

https://plus.google.com/112342237119950323462

Twitter:      

http://twitter.com/MyronLMeters

Linkedin:    

http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=98473409&trk=tab_pro

Pinterest:    

http://pinterest.com/myronlmeters/

YouTube:    

http://www.youtube.com/myronlmeters

News:          

http://waterindustrynews.com

Categories : Uncategorized

Myron L Meters Thanks DuBois Chemicals!

Posted by 14 Jun, 2012

Tweet DuBois (pronounced dew-boy) is a specialty chemical company that is based in Cincinnati, Ohio. Since 1920, our specialized representatives sell and service our chemistry, systems, programs, and solutions across the world. We offer products and services in the following sectors: Process Cleaning and Pretreatment. This sector primarily involves the cleaning of metal and plastic manufactured goods […]

Qr_code

DuBois (pronounced dew-boy) is a specialty chemical company that is based in Cincinnati, Ohio. Since 1920, our specialized representatives sell and service our chemistry, systems, programs, and solutions across the world. We offer products and services in the following sectors:

Process Cleaning and Pretreatment. This sector primarily involves the cleaning of metal and plastic manufactured goods prior to painting and assembly. Specific applications include in-process cleaning and rust inhibition, cleaning and phosphating (the process of putting a coating on metal that improves paint adhesion and retards corrosion), storage rust inhibition, plastic paint pretreatment, paint detackification, rubber to metal bonding, and metal working. Major customers include tier 1 suppliers to the auto industry, fabricated metal producters, industrial machinery, and electrical equipment manufacturers.

Paper Chemicals. This sector supplies cleaning and biological control products and programs to the pulp and paper industry. By combining cleaning expertise with safety-oriented biological control strategies, the Paper Group enhances paper machine performance by minimizing deposits. Major customers include fine paper, newsprint, tissue, paperboard, and pulp mills.

Water Treatment. This sector involves the conditioning of water to protect facility assets such as boilers and cooling towers, and the treatment of waste streams exiting facilities. The typical systems treated are cooling towers < 2000 tons and boilers < 500 HP, although this may vary. Customers include general manufacturing, institutional facilities such as hospitals, hotels, universities, and food processing plants.

Vehicle Cleaning/Industrial Maintenance Products. These sectors include an assortment of applications such as truck, car, and locomotive cleaning, general maintenance cleaning, specialty lubricants (greases and oils) for industrial equipment, asphalt release, and food plant cleaning. Customers include a wide variety of trucking, railroad, auto wash, and manufacturing businesses.

Food Cleaning and Sanitation. DuBois primarily focuses on Open Plant Cleaning (OPC), Clean-in-Place (CIP), and sanitizer applications. Some important innovations include ExteCon extended contact foam and TM Smart Track dry lubrication for conveyors.

Myron L Meters is proud to do business with DuBois Chemicals.

Please visit us on the web at:

http://www.myronlmeters.com

Facebook:  

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Myron-L-Meters/147455608645777

Google +:    

https://plus.google.com/112342237119950323462

Twitter:      

http://twitter.com/MyronLMeters

Linkedin:    

http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=98473409&trk=tab_pro

Pinterest:    

http://pinterest.com/myronlmeters/

YouTube:    

http://www.youtube.com/myronlmeters

News:          

http://waterindustrynews.com

Categories : Uncategorized

Myron L Meters Thanks Linn-Benton Community College!

Posted by 14 Jun, 2012

Tweet LBCC was established in 1966 as a two-year public college to serve the residents of Linn and Benton counties. Because our students’ needs are so diverse, we offer a variety of educational opportunities including: general education courses, professional technical training, lower-division college transfer courses, continuing education classes, lifelong learning opportunities, distance education, credit courses […]

Scientist

LBCC was established in 1966 as a two-year public college to serve the residents of Linn and Benton counties. Because our students’ needs are so diverse, we offer a variety of educational opportunities including:

  • general education courses,
  • professional technical training,
  • lower-division college transfer courses,
  • continuing education classes,
  • lifelong learning opportunities,
  • distance education,
  • credit courses during evening hours and on weekends, so students can earn a degree without having to attend to class on weekdays,
  • adult basic education programs, and
  • education programs for students with disabilities.

LBCC’s 104-acre Albany campus is just two miles south of Albany, Oregon, and 11 miles east of Corvallis. The campus houses a learning resource center, bookstore, 500-seat theater, library, conference facility, and student lounge/recreation rooms. Dining facilities include a cafeteria, a cafe and a restaurant operated by students in the Culinary Arts program. The original 13 contemporary brick buildings are connected by covered walkways that encircle a landscaped courtyard. Additional buildings include the Periwinkle Child Development Center, the Luckiamute Center, physical education and sports facilities, and a greenhouse. An LBCC horse management facility is located a short 1.5 miles from the main campus.

Student services include career counseling, academic and personal guidance, financial aid and student employment, and student leadership and involvement opportunities. All campus facilities and parking are designed to accommodate the needs of people with disabilities, and public buses provide students with free transportation between LBCC and downtown Albany, Corvallis, Philomath, Lebanon, Sweet Home and other communities in East Linn County.

Our community centers offer a wide variety of credit and non-credit classes in Albany, Corvallis, Lebanon, Sweet Home and other locations throughout the district. Some of these courses are transferable and can be taken for credit; others are non-credit, special interest classes.

In addition, our special services for the community include:

  • the Business and Employer Services department, which serves the needs of the business and industrial community;
  • the Family Resources and Education departments, where classes, workshops, consultations and other special services help strengthen families;
  • the Cooperative Work Experience and Service Learning program, in which students receive practical experience in jobs related to their fields of study; and
  • Life and Employment Development, which encompasses the JOBS program and the Turning Point Transitions program.

Supported by tuition, local property taxes and state revenue, the college is directed by an elected, seven-member board of education. Linn-Benton Community College has been accredited by the Accrediting Commission of the Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges. Courses are approved by the Oregon State Board of Education, and lower-division courses are approved for transfer to colleges and universities in the Oregon University System. 

Myron L Meters is proud to do business with Linn-Benton Community College.

Please visit us on the web at:

http://www.myronlmeters.com

Facebook:  

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Myron-L-Meters/147455608645777

Google +:    

https://plus.google.com/112342237119950323462

Twitter:      

http://twitter.com/MyronLMeters

Linkedin:    

http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=98473409&trk=tab_pro

Pinterest:    

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YouTube:    

http://www.youtube.com/myronlmeters

News:          

http://waterindustrynews.com

Categories : Uncategorized

Myron L Meters Thanks Evans Chemetics!

Posted by 14 Jun, 2012

Tweet The Company 1938 Dr. Ralph L. Evans founded “Proprietary Products Laboratories” in Hoboken, NJ. In 1943 the company relocated to Waterloo, NY, and in 1949 was renamed to EVANS CHEMETICS INC. 1978 Evans Chemetics was sold to W.R. Grace and Company. In 1992 the Organic Chemicals Division of W.R. Grace including the Evans Chemetics business was acquired […]

Ah-ds-ep-10-2t

The Company

1938 Dr. Ralph L. Evans founded “Proprietary Products Laboratories” in Hoboken, NJ. In 1943 the company relocated to Waterloo, NY, and in 1949 was renamed to EVANS CHEMETICS INC.

1978 Evans Chemetics was sold to W.R. Grace and Company. In 1992 the Organic Chemicals Division of 
W.R. Grace including the Evans Chemetics business was acquired by Vestar Capital Partners forming Hampshire Chemical Corporation which in 1995 was taken over by Sentrachem, Southafrica. In 1998 Sentrachem was acquired by The Dow Chemical Corporation and Hampshire Chemical Corp. became a fully owned subsidiary.

Finally on Sept 19, 2005, BRUNO BOCK CHEMISCHE FABRIK GMBH & CO. KG, Germany, acquired the Evans Chemetics business unit with its production site in Waterloo, NY, through its fully owned subsidiary EVANS CHEMETICS LP with its office now in Teaneck, NJ. BRUNO BOCK restored the old company name as it has an exceptional reputation in the whole industry. BRUNO BOCK was founded in 1937 by Bruno Bock and is still privately owned.

Since January 1, 2008, BRUNO BOCK acts also as “Only Representative” of EVANS CHEMETICS LP according the European Regulation 1907/2006 (REACH Regulation), article 8. Those products EVANS CHEMETICS sells directly or indirectly in the countries of the European Community are preregistered and will be registered depending on their tonnage in the years 2010, 2013 and 2018. See also www.brunobock.de


    Glenpointe Center, Teaneck, NJ, with EVANS CHEMETICS LP office on 4th Floor


EVANS CHEMETICS manufactures ORGANIC DIVALENT SULFUR CHEMICALS and is now together with BRUNO BOCK as parent company the worldwide leading producer of Thioglycolic Acid (CAS# 68-11-1) andMercaptopropionic Acid (CAS# 107-96-0) and their derivitives. 
Additionally Thiodipropionic Acid (CAS# 111-17-1), and its derivatives are produced as antioxidants.
EVANS CHEMETICS also manufactures a large number of specialty sulfur chemicals being the worldwide leading producer of Thioglycerol (CAS# 96-27-5)Ethanolamine Sulfite (CAS# 15535-29-2)
Sulfoethyl Methacrylate (CAS# 10595-80-9) and others. Our products find applications in hair care, cosmetics, food packaging, food additive, pharmaceuticals, plastics, and many other uses.

We at EVANS CHEMETICS maintain with an innovative and highly skilled lean organization and long, steady and successful experiences in the global marketplace a commitment to our esteemed customer base. 
In this regard, our foremost goal is to provide unmatched quality and undivided dedication to our customers.


Our product line is flexible and reliable. Sustainability of our products drives us continuously to development of better qualities with improved processes under permanent control of our environment.

Myron L Meters is proud to do business with Evans Chemetics.

Please visit us on the web at:

http://www.myronlmeters.com

Facebook:  

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Myron-L-Meters/147455608645777

Google +:    

https://plus.google.com/112342237119950323462

Twitter:      

http://twitter.com/MyronLMeters

Linkedin:    

http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=98473409&trk=tab_pro

Pinterest:    

http://pinterest.com/myronlmeters/

YouTube:    

http://www.youtube.com/myronlmeters

News:          

http://waterindustrynews.com

Categories : Uncategorized

Myron L Meters Thanks DuBois Chemicals!

Posted by 14 Jun, 2012

Tweet DuBois (pronounced dew-boy) is a specialty chemical company that is based in Cincinnati, Ohio. Since 1920, our specialized representatives sell and service our chemistry, systems, programs, and solutions across the world. We offer products and services in the following sectors: Process Cleaning and Pretreatment. This sector primarily involves the cleaning of metal and plastic manufactured goods […]

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DuBois (pronounced dew-boy) is a specialty chemical company that is based in Cincinnati, Ohio. Since 1920, our specialized representatives sell and service our chemistry, systems, programs, and solutions across the world. We offer products and services in the following sectors:

Process Cleaning and Pretreatment. This sector primarily involves the cleaning of metal and plastic manufactured goods prior to painting and assembly. Specific applications include in-process cleaning and rust inhibition, cleaning and phosphating (the process of putting a coating on metal that improves paint adhesion and retards corrosion), storage rust inhibition, plastic paint pretreatment, paint detackification, rubber to metal bonding, and metal working. Major customers include tier 1 suppliers to the auto industry, fabricated metal producters, industrial machinery, and electrical equipment manufacturers.

Paper Chemicals. This sector supplies cleaning and biological control products and programs to the pulp and paper industry. By combining cleaning expertise with safety-oriented biological control strategies, the Paper Group enhances paper machine performance by minimizing deposits. Major customers include fine paper, newsprint, tissue, paperboard, and pulp mills.

Water Treatment. This sector involves the conditioning of water to protect facility assets such as boilers and cooling towers, and the treatment of waste streams exiting facilities. The typical systems treated are cooling towers < 2000 tons and boilers < 500 HP, although this may vary. Customers include general manufacturing, institutional facilities such as hospitals, hotels, universities, and food processing plants.

Vehicle Cleaning/Industrial Maintenance Products. These sectors include an assortment of applications such as truck, car, and locomotive cleaning, general maintenance cleaning, specialty lubricants (greases and oils) for industrial equipment, asphalt release, and food plant cleaning. Customers include a wide variety of trucking, railroad, auto wash, and manufacturing businesses.

Food Cleaning and Sanitation. DuBois primarily focuses on Open Plant Cleaning (OPC), Clean-in-Place (CIP), and sanitizer applications. Some important innovations include ExteCon extended contact foam and TM Smart Track dry lubrication for conveyors.

Myron L Meters is proud to do business with DuBois Chemicals.

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Myron L Meters Thanks Linn-Benton Community College!

Posted by 14 Jun, 2012

Tweet LBCC was established in 1966 as a two-year public college to serve the residents of Linn and Benton counties. Because our students’ needs are so diverse, we offer a variety of educational opportunities including: general education courses, professional technical training, lower-division college transfer courses, continuing education classes, lifelong learning opportunities, distance education, credit courses […]

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LBCC was established in 1966 as a two-year public college to serve the residents of Linn and Benton counties. Because our students’ needs are so diverse, we offer a variety of educational opportunities including:

  • general education courses,
  • professional technical training,
  • lower-division college transfer courses,
  • continuing education classes,
  • lifelong learning opportunities,
  • distance education,
  • credit courses during evening hours and on weekends, so students can earn a degree without having to attend to class on weekdays,
  • adult basic education programs, and
  • education programs for students with disabilities.

LBCC’s 104-acre Albany campus is just two miles south of Albany, Oregon, and 11 miles east of Corvallis. The campus houses a learning resource center, bookstore, 500-seat theater, library, conference facility, and student lounge/recreation rooms. Dining facilities include a cafeteria, a cafe and a restaurant operated by students in the Culinary Arts program. The original 13 contemporary brick buildings are connected by covered walkways that encircle a landscaped courtyard. Additional buildings include the Periwinkle Child Development Center, the Luckiamute Center, physical education and sports facilities, and a greenhouse. An LBCC horse management facility is located a short 1.5 miles from the main campus.

Student services include career counseling, academic and personal guidance, financial aid and student employment, and student leadership and involvement opportunities. All campus facilities and parking are designed to accommodate the needs of people with disabilities, and public buses provide students with free transportation between LBCC and downtown Albany, Corvallis, Philomath, Lebanon, Sweet Home and other communities in East Linn County.

Our community centers offer a wide variety of credit and non-credit classes in Albany, Corvallis, Lebanon, Sweet Home and other locations throughout the district. Some of these courses are transferable and can be taken for credit; others are non-credit, special interest classes.

In addition, our special services for the community include:

  • the Business and Employer Services department, which serves the needs of the business and industrial community;
  • the Family Resources and Education departments, where classes, workshops, consultations and other special services help strengthen families;
  • the Cooperative Work Experience and Service Learning program, in which students receive practical experience in jobs related to their fields of study; and
  • Life and Employment Development, which encompasses the JOBS program and the Turning Point Transitions program.

Supported by tuition, local property taxes and state revenue, the college is directed by an elected, seven-member board of education. Linn-Benton Community College has been accredited by the Accrediting Commission of the Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges. Courses are approved by the Oregon State Board of Education, and lower-division courses are approved for transfer to colleges and universities in the Oregon University System. 

Myron L Meters is proud to do business with Linn-Benton Community College.

Please visit us on the web at:

http://www.myronlmeters.com

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Myron L Meters Thanks Industrial Distribution Group!

Posted by 8 Jun, 2012

Tweet Industrial Distribution Group, Inc. is the market leader in the design, build, and management of supply chain solutions and a national distributor of indirect materials .  Our knowledgeable and experienced Associates strive to deliver world class service and provide cost take-out initiatives for our Customers.  Our suite of supply chain solutions embodies our specialized […]

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Industrial Distribution Group, Inc. is the market leader in the design, build, and management of supply chain solutions and a national distributor of indirect materials .  Our knowledgeable and experienced Associates strive to deliver world class service and provide cost take-out initiatives for our Customers. 

Our suite of supply chain solutions embodies our specialized supply chain knowledge in product procurement, inventory management, product application, and process improvements.  We currently provide solutions for over 600 global companies and institutions.

Our decades of experience enable us to provide our Customers with solutions designed specifically for their requirements.  We can deliver lower total product cost as a tier one supplier through our relationships with the world’s leading indirect material manufacturers.

What sets us apart is our process oriented approach that delivers consistently improved results for our Customers through the following services:

Supply Chain Solutions

Integration of the supply chain takes cost out of the process, improves cash flow and improves your operating income.  Our solutions can reduce or eliminate your day-to-day tactical tasks enabling you to completely focus on strategic results.  

Full Storeroom Management (Integrated Supply) …more

Customer Managed Inventory (CMI) … more

Vendor Managed Inventory (VMI) … more

Dispensing … more

On Site Representative … more

Punch Out … more

Customer Managed Storeroom (Storeroom Software) … more

E-Catalog

Order from over 150,000 items and manage your entire account on-line with our e-Commerce solution.  Monitor monthly budget spend, track usage by user, view order history and invoices – all in real time.  Intuitive search capabilities make it easy to find what you need.  Order on account or with a credit card secured by PayPal™.

… more

Documented Cost Savings

We specialize in helping you reach your cost savings goals through process improvement, inventory reduction, supplier consolidation and overall cost savings.

Technical Specialists

We have earned a strong reputation as a distributor with considerable technical and product application capabilities in all major product categories.  Our specialists and factory representatives can help you implement initiatives to improve your manufacturing processes, increase throughput and lower your costs… . more

Products and Brands

We are a tier one supplier and maintain relationships with the world’s leading manufacturers and together search for new and innovative ideas to improve your manufacturing process.  We work with you to evaluate your operation through on-site surveys and product analysis, product recommendations, SKU optimization and consolidation… . more

Quality Business Management System

As an ISO 9001:2008 certified company, we work with our Customers to improve their processes using our world-class Business Management System, incorporating well respected programs such as Lean, Six-Sigma, Kaizen, and others. 

Tool and Application Services

We can help meet calibration and certification requirements to reduce downtime through our assembly tool service programs.  Our trained technicians perform diagnostics, analyze results and perform necessary maintenance checks to keep your tools running smoothly and your productivity high.  We also offer technical support and custom application solutions.  Let our qualified associates design a custom solution to save you time and money

Myron L Meters is proud to do business with IDG.

Please visit us on the web at:

http://www.myronlmeters.com

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News:          

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